August 6th, 2015

Jenny Davis_ Orange Lot


My abstractions are investigations into the process of decay and renewal. I explore, neglected corners, crevices, abandoned spaces and nature, for the evidence of time.

In the Studio. Painting & Study.

September 24th, 2015

In the Studio. Painting. & Study.

After a short break in warm Queensland, (freezing today in the Yarra Valley) I’m back in the studio, working on a series of large paintings for my next solo exhibition.

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I’m also feeling, very inspired to create something with a pile of old sandstone blocks, I’ve had laying around for years. They have weathered beautifully!

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In between, I need to finish my course with Dottie Media

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and start the new one with Stephanie Levy.

Will be nice when it gets warmer in Melbourne:)









In the Studio Today. Orange. Copper. Gold.

August 8th, 2015

In the Studio Today. Orange. Copper. Gold.

Closing up the studio today, for holidays, I couldn’t help it. I just had to touch my paintings. 3 hours later…

Thank you! “Upstairs at Duroc” magazine in Paris.

July 20th, 2015

Thank you! “Upstairs at Duroc” magazine in Paris.

I’m very excited, because, once again, my artwork has been chosen to be included in this, “Literary & Arts Journal of Paris”.

Everybody is welcome to ,“Upstairs at Duroc“magazine launch, for Issue 16, in Paris this October. So, if you are lucky enough to be in Paris, France, at that time, come along and join in the fun!



Axis of Evil Sonata. Equilibrium. Sculpture.

July 19th, 2015

Axis of Evil Sonata. Equilibrium. Sculpture.

It’s never too late… finally after many changes, a couple of sculpture’s I started back in 2006 are now complete. ( I think). Sometimes I have to wait around a long time for the right object to turn up. Of course, I don’t know what it is until I come across it.

TITLE – Axis of Evil Sonata. 2006-2015




SIZE – 19x12x11cm. approx




MED – plastic cowboy, eagle, wooden music box, mirror, metal, glass vials, black sand, paper,enamel paint, music box movement.




Found -Object sculpture. Music box beats out Beethoven’s “Moonlight Sonata” while a gunslinger from the “Wild West” spins around. Beside the black box sit, 5 glass vials, filled with fine black gravel. The inside of the box is filled with more, fine black gravel. Reflections on war and global conflict. A response to the invasion into Iraq, 2003.


TITLE- Equilibrium. 2006-2015





SIZE- 18″ x 8″ – 47x20cm approx.
MED – plastic,rock-metal,music box ballerina,wire, enamel paint.




Composure. Mental or emotional balance.



Gestural Acrylic Paintings. Mixed Media on Canvas.

June 26th, 2015

Gestural Acrylic Paintings. Mixed Media on Canvas.

Mixed media on gallery stretched canvas.

Acrylic paint & oil pigments.


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Spontaneous gestural marks


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with a play of colour


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and forgotten marks


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on gallery stretched canvas.


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Landscapes of traces


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left behind


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in the environment


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and mind.

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Each painting measures, 40cm. x 30cm. x 4cm.


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Year completed, 2015



Professional Arts Business. Artist’s Wear Many Hats.

June 24th, 2015

Artist’s Wear Many Hats. Professional Arts Business.

Wouldn’t it be nice to get up everyday and just create and not have to worry about running an arts practice. Being an artist today means you are in business. You can’t survive on sales alone and have to create opportunities for yourself for those, who want to make a living from it.

According to the Australian Tax Office,“A professional arts business is a business you carry on as an author of an artistic work. This can be the artist, sculptor or photographer who created the work.”




Artists need to wear many hats: creator, promoter, product developer, maker, writer, photographer, record keeper, shipper, packer, marketer, customer service rep. and so much more.

There are no hard and fast rules, or right or wrong way, on how, to run an arts business. Just use your creativity, trust your own artistic impulses and have fun. A few of my tips . ( Not in any order)




Get plenty of rest.

Eat and sleep well.

Exercise daily. Walk, even if it’s only around your own garden.




Make an effort to create everyday, even if it’s only for 10 mins. I have bouts of creativity, every few days. They can last days, weeks, or months. When I am working to a deadline though, I just have to create and everything else needs to take second place.


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I try to have enough work ready, for 2 exhibitions, just encase I’m asked to have a show, suddenly. (It has happened to me 2 times this year)




I have finally, learned, to say NO in my life and business. I am now, very selective in choosing, exhibitions and work I do. Once upon a time, I took on everything offered to me and suffered severe burnout.

Write down ideas and visuals in a small sketch book, journal. Keep it beside you everywhere. I make, or, bulk buy, sketch books when school sales are on.


Jenny Davis_ Hession Journal


Ask for help when you need it. Partners, family friends or professional help. Barter with your art if your unable to pay someone to help.


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I find sitting at the computer in short bouts helps, as, I have back, neck and arm problems.

Tweaking my online websites, is a full time job, in itself. I get it done, in small bits, daily.

I check my emails when I get up in the morning. Any sales, or urgent things, I try to deal with straight away, otherwise, I worry all day and night and won’t get anything, done.

I make major lists of all the biggish, events, exhibitions, grant writing, gallery submission, residency applications, I want to apply for, over next 12 months. I then, cut down the jobs, I need to do into small steps, to achieve my goals.I recently found a good site for this Evernote I use the basic free plan.




1 or 2 days a week I photograph and document my artwork.

As soon as I make a sale, commission etc. I document it and keep a record of my customers, contact details and which artwork they bought.


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A website is a must for every artist, as most galleries want to see an online portfolio, for submissions, including, awards and arts residency, jobs and courses you apply for.

Facebook business pages, Twitter pages and other social media sites, all help you to get your art seen. Link up your website/blog post updates, to automatically post to your Facebook, Twitter and all your other social media sites.


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A blog is like your own personal space to create in. I use mine, as an art journal, to share, ideas, work in progress and a bit about, who I am. As well, it’s a place to see and buy my artwork.

Make a video of your creative process. People are interested in what you do. Make sure to have your website details in the credits so they see more art at your website.


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Take risks. Be resilient, flexible and find innovative ways to make money to fund your art.

Diversify with your art, without diluting it, so you can make a living. Doesn’t mean you are compromising yourself, or art. It’s just another, clever way, to get your art out there, make an income and continue your creative ideas.

Example: Limited edition art prints and quality home-wares etc. Teach from your studio, or create, online art courses. It all helps you make an income, so you can continue creating the art you want to do.


Modern living room with white colors

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(I sold a selection of my art throw pillows and prints, which were curated, into an exhibition, at Federation Square, in Melbourne in, 2014) Helped fund, new art materials petrol and food.


Meet the Tenant 11


Make an arts mailing list. First, ask people, if they want to be on it. ( suppliers, customers, friends, collectors, galleries,magazines, interior designers, architects, director’s, artists and all those who have shown an interest in your art etc.)

Have packaging ready and try to reuse and recycle packaging where possible for when the sales come in.

I also, buy custom made boxes for my artworks and rigid mailers, cello bags for smaller ones. Every couple of months I do a inventory of packaging, to see what I need to replenish.




Ship only a couple times a week so your not having to go out everyday.

Most of my art sales are overseas. To save money,  I package them myself, weigh them and go to the Auspost website, to calculate domestic and international costs.




Most important! Take time out to do something different, or relax and do nothing.




I need to get out of the studio occasionally, to spend time with other artists, family and friends.




Spoil yourself, or someone else.

Have fun!

Mixed Media Painting on Paper. Acrylic paint. Oil Pigment. Shellac & Rag Paper.

June 21st, 2015

Mixed Media Painting on Paper.


Acrylic paint


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Oil Pigment


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Shellac & Rag Paper


Found Object Installation. Stacks. Ideas & Photography.

June 15th, 2015

Found Object Installation & Stacks. Ideas & Photography.

I like to hijack, pull-apart, dissect and manipulate, familiar and found objects, to give new meaning to my installations, photograph’s and 3d ideas.


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As a child, I would create little dioramas and arrangements and place them in my everyday environment, hoping to alter my reality, for awhile.

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I used to watch my mum do this, to pretty- up the house and garden. She would use, whatever, objects we had on hand.


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Using plastic flowers, decorated doilies and domestic objects, she would make our surrounds more, pleasing.


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I recall an amazing tower of old TV’s, stacked high, with plastic fruit, flowers, floral china and decorated cloths in between.


A stack of hand-made books

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A stack of shotgun cartridges


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Rock and a hard place


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Bench top full of found objects


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Endless ideas to play with…


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See more images here


Collecting. What do you like to Collect?

May 28th, 2015

Collecting. What do you like to Collect? Collecting can become so addictive, especially for an artist. My found objects and things are the inspiration and starting point for most of my artwork and ideas. When I see something, it can trigger off an instant idea and give me a vision to work with. I think this is why I love museums, as display and arranging objects are an important part of my sculptural and photographic work.



I have been collecting since I was born. I used to hide stuff under my bed in boxes as a child. As an adult, I’m still putting stuff into boxes, plastic bags and other strange things. I view my collections as arrangements. They are all art installations scattered around my place, as well as, material for use in my arts projects




Walking through the streets to the local shop I always come home with something foot trodden. A piece of paper, packaging, a bright piece of plastic, glass all, will be used in my art, eventually.




When I travel overseas (much to the sometimes embarrassment to friends and family) I pick up off the ground, bottle tops, lolly papers, wires bright bits of plastic, even if an item might disturb me, I’ll bring it home. On a tour once, in Europe the whole busload of passengers collected bottle tops for me.




My stuff may brood for years in a dark space or cupboard, till I come across it again, sending me off on another project.




On my last trip to France, I came home with 15 kilo of junk. I collected baguette bags, string, stones, free ad cards, labels from food items, torn posters, books and papers from a bin.






I also, collect vintage photographs. They tell stories of people and places, I’ll never know about, so, I make my own narrative.




Scientific stuff, equations, wire, tin, bones, animal skeletons, fur, hair, watches, old mobile covers, old shuttlecocks, vintage buttons, eye glasses, shriveled things, found numbers and fonts from keyboards.








Magazines and advertising, boxes, packaging, all sorts paper, vintage clothes, fabrics, wall papers, shells, vintage items and china, driftwood, snow-globes, toys, children’s books and so much more




I go to op shops, city streets, airports, underground spaces, beaches, garage sales, friends houses and sometimes, find stuff on EBay. Part of the fun and attraction for me is, the actual finding of discarded material that has been thrown away. I will recycle it into something else or, just show it’s beauty, as it is.




Collections of things are extremely important, for future generations too. 100’s of years from now, someone may come across my piece of fabric, wallpaper ,lolly paper, box ,bone etc. that will give them information on how we lived in our time, in our place.

Collections are also portraits of those who love to glean…..

Check out Andy Warhol’s boxes of stuff he collected over his life time
“Warhol Time Capsules”

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