Posts Tagged ‘creative space’

The Venice Biennale 57. Wallmatter 17.

Saturday, May 6th, 2017

I just found out my painting “Wallmatter 17” has selected to be presented as a digital display at, The Biennial Project’s extravagant, event in Venice, Italy, during the opening/press week of The Venice Biennale 57. “La Biennale di Venezia”

Thank you The Biennial Project!

 

TITLE Wallmatter 17
MED Acrylic paint, lime, sand, cement, sealer on canvas. (Contemporary washed veneer wooden frame)

Arts Business Ideas. Artist’s Websites. Jenny Davis.

Monday, April 25th, 2016

Arts Business Ideas. Artist’s Websites. Jenny Davis.

Outlook8studio -Jenny Davis

 

Over the past 14 years, I have been promoting and selling my art online, as well as, exhibiting my artwork worldwide. I have also had many artists contact me, during this time, wanting to know, how I market, promote and sell my artwork on and offline. So in this post, I would like to share a few things I’ve learned from having my own, artist’s website and a few other arts business tips.

 

Outlook8studio_ Jenny Davis Etsy

 

Very early on, I learned, if you want people to take you seriously, your career as an artist is only as serious as you take it. You either work at it, as a job, putting in “regular” hours, or “occasionally” as a hobby. Its either a hobby, or your job. As a working artist its about working on your art day by day, as well as, marketing your art in all areas.

 

Dimmy_small

 

I think every artist needs a website! With some hard work in the initial stages of setting up your own website, it’s always, worthwhile, getting your art online. In your own space you can do anything.

 

Jenny Davis_Wallmatter Paintings_Mixed Media_ 2016 small

 

Exposing your art online, helps promote and gets your work seen worldwide by potential collectors, gallery directors and other artists for collaborations and projects. Remember though, you are also competing with millions of other artists artwork, as well. So, your website, which is your online creative space, has to be place where, people will want to stop and spend time.

 

 

Handmade Brushes_ Jenny Davis

 

After the initial set-up of my own website, with the generous help of several family members, (who I am forever grateful too) I then, had to put in the hard yards myself and learn the rest. I did many courses, tutorials and googled everything, I wanted to know. I soon found out, it’s not just a matter of making the website, uploading your artworks and sitting back, waiting for sales to walk out the door. Sounds great! But, it doesn’t usually work that way.

 

IMG_20130903_124227

 

You have to work really hard on your arts business and take it seriously. Mostly on a daily, or weekly basis, promoting, marketing, photographing artworks, descriptions, layouts, seo, meta tags, as well as, getting your website seen in many areas, including search engines.

 

IMG_20160211_140742

 

Social media is one way of getting your website seen if you post regularly. A Facebook business page,  Twitter and Instagram account will help you get a following, who in turn, may visit your website to find out more.

 

Jenny Davis_Work in progress_book s

 

Create newsletters, blog posts set- up exhibitions and share your art life with others on your website. Network and collaborate with other artist’s on forums and in art groups.

On your website and social- media sites, its good to share, how you make your art, your challenges, your successes. Make it real! This will build up a following of people who are genuinely interested in your art, and, in what you do. People want to trust and get to know an artist, before they buy online.

 

 

Jenny Davis_Work in progress_Cigar tins s

 

Unless your famous, well known, or an established artist, picked up by reputable galleries, as a working artist, you really need to learn, how to diversify with your art.

It may not suit every artist, but, if you want to make a living from your art, these days, you need to be a creative business person too. Be open to, exploring other creative avenues, for sales and work. Your bread and butter money. This can be done alongside making, your more, serious gut- felt work for exhibitions and projects

 

Jenny Davis_Wallmatter Project 2

 

My bread and butter online websites Outlook8studio, Strazz and Atelierinparis I do have a vintage shop, as well,  Nostalgi but, after 8 years of being on Etsy, I am in the process of downsizing all shops and combining some together. Many thanks to some wonderful business advice, I received from Penny! at Sparrow Savage recently.

 

Modern living room with white colors

 

When uploading your artwork images onto your website, always make sure your photographs are professional looking, not blurred and as close possible to the colours in your original artwork. After-all,  it’s your photographs that sell your art, online.

 

Jenny Davis_ Paint in Progress 6

 

Great customer service is a must! Quickly answer any questions and concerns your customer may have. Don’t argue with your customers and be polite. If you do come across a problem, try to stay calm, cool and business- like, in your correspondence with them. They will eventually go away, but a bad business reputation won’t online.

 

Jenny Davis_Wallmatter single_ 2016

 

Packaging your artwork. Wrap your artwork professionally. I like to include a hand- signed “Certificate of Authenticity” (A statement that a work of art is genuine) with my artworks. To package small to medium size paintings on stretched canvas, I first wrap layers of acid free, tissue paper around the painting, then cut out a piece of stiff cardboard for each side. Bubble wrap it all, then pop the package into a custom- made box. A “thank you” note and instructions on how to look after the artwork, included in your package, goes a long way. Remember to slip in some extra business cards too, that can be passed onto other potential collectors/customers.

 

Art packing_Jenny Davis

If your artwork needs to be framed behind glass, I would suggest using, crystal clear perspex instead of glass. It looks like glass and is much safer and lighter, to ship, especially internationally, without the costs of breakages.

Once you get used to having a website and a presence online. It does get easier and is not so overwhelming. You may find by having your own website, it will open up a whole new world of opportunities for you and your arts business as well get your your artwork sold and out of the studio.

 

Jenny Davis_Wallmatter Paintings lot_ 2016

 

What do you do to get your art seen online?

 

 

Times Square Show New York.

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014

I just got a nice surprise to say my artwork will be included in the Times Square Show in New York.

You’re in our celebration! You get three spots in our Times Square show. Your work will be 10 feet (3 meters) tall on the sign!

I am also, halfway of having an image of my work, 200 feet (60 meters) tall on the entire massive billboard !  If you would like to help me takeover the whole billboard in Times Square, the images below will take you to a like button.

A HUGE thank you to everyone for your continued support of my arts career! I really appreciate it 🙂

 

Didja!

Jenny Davis_Didja print smaller

Kea Blue

Kea Blue etsy

Fragility

Jenny Davis_Fragility_2013 Smaller

 

 

My favourite artist of the month. Anselm Kiefer.

Saturday, March 9th, 2013

 

My favourite artist of the month is Anselm Kiefer. A German artist who creates paintings and monumental installations with crusted surfaces, incorporating, lead, concrete, ash, acid, earth, glass and gold, broken glass, oil, emulsion, shellac, acrylic and raw materials from nature.

 

1_e_overyourcities1016-Anselm-Kiefer-Himmelsschlucht-2011-20123324kiefer_toilespages and planesh2_1995.14.4100066473a1fd3a2469753d346be80982_1kiefer 6Painting    Anselm Kiefer, The Wave - detailnational-art03

I particularly like Kiefer’s ambitious project of transforming an old derilict silk factory in La Ribaute France into a monumental studio art complex where he created his monumental works. He dug out underground chambers, tunnels, to create living and working spaces  set amongst strange, reinforced, concrete towers and bunkers, woods and caves. There was even a crypt, an amphitheatre and underground pool.

A trailer from the movie “Over Your Cities Grass Will Grow” about Kiefer’s last days at the studio.

 

Robert Hughes on Anselm Kiefer

 

A record of an assistant’s time with Anselm Kiefer from his studio in Barjac. This was in 1999 -2000.

 

Underground Spaces & Art. Beneath the City of Paris.

Friday, December 28th, 2012

Underground Spaces & Art. Beneath the City of Paris. Throughout the world underground complexes criss cross beneath the surface of the above-ground world. There is a thriving underground world where the average person never gets to see…unless that person knows where to look. Fascinating subterranean cities and hidden underground spaces that dwell beneath our feet.

 

MTT EsmallB1jpgsB21jpg

 

For instance, beneath the city of Paris below the Metro tunnels under the railway, stations, is another thriving world where people work 24hr’s maintaining the entire transport system to keep it working at its peak. There’s the famous underground cemetery the Catacombs”les carrières de Paris” full of caverns and tunnels. The walls are laden with an interesting installations of skulls and bones.

 

MTT B1MTT C1MTT H smaller 1

 

Wherever I go, I like to explore hidden underground spaces. In Paris I found a very special space under an apartment. Down there, I create stories, art and listen to the silence & chatter of the walls. I like to set up little dioramas between the red doors, damp earth walls and the ground. I then photograph and make little video’s of the scenes for later projects.

Textural Surface Paintings. Barcelona Spain.

Monday, October 29th, 2012

Textural Surface Paintings I did in Spain.
In 2005 I was artist in residence at the Can Serrat International Art Center in Barcelona, Spain. During this time I completed several series of works; which developed as a result of solitary expeditions into the surrounding areas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Textural oil paintings on linen, linked to ancient Catalan architecture.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My little paintings are rubbings from actual surfaces around the Barcelona, Spain.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ancient markings weathered , subtle & chalky

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I added colour to my work with pure powder pigments and oils, hand mixed in my studio.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See more of my artwork at Outlook8studio on Etsy

 

UX, for “Urban Experiment.”

Saturday, July 21st, 2012

I just love this story …inspires me to keep working on my art projects which link back to my own treks of working in underground spaces below Paris over the past 5 years.

Thirty years ago, in the dead of night, a group of six Parisian teenagers pulled off what would prove to be a fateful theft. They met up at a small café near the Eiffel Tower to review their plans—again—before heading out into the dark. Read full story by Jon Lackman …

 

 

 

 

 

“LAND TO LIGHT – Photo Diaries”

Monday, April 23rd, 2012
 All Photo’s by Charles Farrugia
Here are some pictures of the opening and links

Make a Large Studio Easel in 6 Easy – Peasy Steps

Saturday, February 4th, 2012

IMG_20150520_115511

 

How to Make a Large Studio Easel in 6 Easy- Peasy Steps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When I built my studio years ago, I needed to have a versatile easel. I couldn’t find anything suitable in the shops and my budget wouldn’t allow for much.  So, I went about creating one from my left over pieces of timber. I needed one that would take small to very large canvas’s all at once. I needed lots of space too. Being an abstract painter, I slosh paint and work very quickly, sometimes on many canvas’s at once. I wanted a permanent spac,e where I could work on small canvas’s 30x30cm up to very large ones 4 x 2 Meters . My easel ended up being 9 meters long x 4 meters high and after 12 years of daily use, my rough and ready easel is still going strong.

My simple Plan

Materials & Equipment

Cut yourself, or buy 2 equal lengths of  hardwood or pine, however long you want the easel to be. This is for the floor and wall runner that will hold all the upright struts.

Cut yourself, or buy equal lengths of hardwood or pine for the uprights. Decide how many uprights you want to hold your canvas .To get the length of each piece , measure from floor to top wall at the angle you want the easel to be.

Bolts, nails or screws

Wooden dowel lengths of wood for pegs

Drill with a “spade” drill bit the same circumference as the dowel pieces you have

(Spade bits are used for rough boring holes in wood.)

Tape measure

Hammer

Drill

Method

 

1.Everything will need to be measured and cut for the area your are working on.

 

2. Grab the floor runner piece, lay it perpendicular to the wall on the floor, judging the best space between the floor runner and the wall . Screw, bolt or nail to the floor at intervals to secure. (Note) Remember to allow enough space from floor runner to wall for a slight angle for the upright pieces of wood so your painting canvas can to sit without falling

 

 

3. Grab the wall runner piece and screw, bolt or nail to the upper wall at intervals and make secure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. Lay all your upright pieces of wood together on a flat surface together (floor )and take your drill with the spade bit and make holes from bottom to the top on all the lengths of wood. The spacing has to be equal across the whole lot.

(If painting the easel do this now before attaching to wall)

5. Take your pre- cut lengths of wood with the holes and sit each one so the bottom is sitting behind the attached floor runner and at the top against the wall runner with the holes facing you. Screw bolt or nail the upright struts to the floor runner and to the wall runner at top. (Note) Go along the floor runner at whatever spacing you want with the upright struts to be.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Almost done. Cut lengths ( 6inches) of dowel for the pegs that will hold all your canvas’s

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note: If the pegs don’t fit in the holes… Round off one end with sandpaper by hand, or with an electric sander.

All done!!!  Now grab your canvas and paint to your hearts content

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Art Squats. Hybrid Arts. Studio in a box Paris.

Sunday, October 2nd, 2011

I believe Art can no longer be only confined within the walls of established art institutions and be thought as only painting or sculpture. At a time when we are at the peak of global creativity I see artists refusing to be labelled and contained. Art venues and spaces are struggling to keep up and are experimenting with new ways to present this explosion of creative output artists for multidisciplinary and multidimensional.

When I was in Paris last time I saw evidence of this. In a city of almost 300,000 living artists Paris seems to find creative outlets for multidisciplinary and multidimensional. Little “Hybrid art” spaces are popping up everywhere in the streets. Artists themselves have had to think of innovative ways to get their art seen.Many making their home an art space open to the public.

Art squats, sandwiched between homes in residential areas, art has taken over abandoned buildings where a rich cultural life of concerts, debates, exhibitions, lectures and workshops unravels in clandestine venues.

When I’m in Paris I have a couple of creative spaces I made out of necessity. “Studioinabox” and “The Dungeon”

“Studioinabox” is a wooden trunk in the apartment living room where all my creative materials are stored. I create the work on top of the box or the floor space. As I move from country to country my “nomad art’ has to be small and transportable. I enjoy the challenge creating in the immediate space and using only items I collect from the streets,used packaging and a few other bought art supplies that I can fit into my “Studioinabox’

‘The Dungeon” is a space underneath an apartment block in Paris. It’s damp, smelly and creepy with dark corridors, full of earth walls with red wooden doors. The lights are on a timer and go out every minute, so you can be stuck in a very unearthly dark abyss, if you don’t press one of the buttons on the wall quick enough. I have devised a way to stop them turning off and over the years, I have become more brave and allow myself to connect to the dark hole, for longer periods. Eventually I want to open the space and show my video and photography down there. I also have ideas of a performance in the space.

In Australia I find there are too many artists and not enough art spaces as well. So, I’m playing around with a few ideas using my home and website, as my art space for all sorts of creative experiments. Nothing, is fully formulated or resolved yet, and will keep you all informed of my progress from this blog.

Do you have a special space where you create and show your work?