Posts Tagged ‘Arts promotion’

The Venice Biennale 57. Wallmatter 17.

Saturday, May 6th, 2017

I just found out my painting “Wallmatter 17” has selected to be presented as a digital display at, The Biennial Project’s extravagant, event in Venice, Italy, during the opening/press week of The Venice Biennale 57. “La Biennale di Venezia”

Thank you The Biennial Project!

 

TITLE Wallmatter 17
MED Acrylic paint, lime, sand, cement, sealer on canvas. (Contemporary washed veneer wooden frame)

Vintage Pulp Artwork & Article Published in US. Magazine.

Saturday, June 4th, 2016

Artwork & Article Published in US. Magazine.

 

 

Vintage Pulp

Congratulations on having your artwork and article published in Sew Somerset!

Earlier this year I was approached by Stampington & Company in the USA. to write a feature article, about my mixed- media collages, for their magazine.

Today I am happy to announce my article and artwork has been published and is featured in the latest, “Sew Somerset Summer 2016” magazine.

 

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My paper mixed media collages, are created from old, damaged, vintage pulp fiction book pages, vintage pieces of linen and more.

I will post photographs of the article and where you can buy the magazine soon!

 

“Wallmatter” Exhibition Progress. Jenny Davis 2016.

Sunday, May 29th, 2016

“Wallmatter” Exhibition Progress. Jenny Davis 2016.

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All my paintings are now finished and have been taken to the framers for my upcoming exhibition, in July and I managed to fit all, 17 paintings, into the car for the short trip to Healesville.

 

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While the paintings are at the framers I have been creating and finishing off, other pieces in the show. It has also, given me pockets of time to concentrate on the written stuff, which I find a bit difficult sometimes.

 

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My art statement has changed a million times, but I think I’m happy with it now. Id rather just let my artwork speak for itself but, finally, after many years, I’m actually starting to enjoy the process of writing the art statement. I see it now, as an extension of my work and not, just an unrelated, add on . As an artist, you know yourself, what your art is all about, but putting it out there, for the viewer, in words, honestly, without all that “artspeak”, is a whole different art, I’ve had to learn over the years.

 

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If you need help writing art statements, here is fantastic book that has helped me.  “Art-Write. The Writing Guide for Visual Artists by Vicki Krohn Amorose.”  It’s a simple, step by step guide on writing, not only, art statements but also,  speeches, proposals, bio, press release’s and more. Its all related to the visual artist.

 

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The ad for “Art Almanac” magazine has been designed and sent off to the magazine and the invite/ad for “Wallmatter” exhibition, has been designed, with some help from my daughter overseas in France… Amazing Skype!

 

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The catalogue price list has taken a long time as every detail of every single piece has to be written down and priced.  It’s an ongoing venture and still in progress as I keep adding more pieces. The food and drinks for the opening have all been taken care of, thanks, to a couple of dear friends for their help.

 

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I’m still making some flat concrete stands I want to sit my sculpture’s on. One of them broke, so I’m not sure yet, whether Ill to use them, or not. I also need to find a way to get my paintings to the exhibition. Once framed they won’t fit into my car. Something I didn’t think off:)

 

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The last thing I will need to do is photograph and document all the pieces, before they are sent off to the gallery. Encase they don’t come back home again:) Hopefully!

 

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More details of what? when? and where? coming very soon!

 

 

Arts Business Ideas. Artist’s Websites. Jenny Davis.

Monday, April 25th, 2016

Arts Business Ideas. Artist’s Websites. Jenny Davis.

Outlook8studio -Jenny Davis

 

Over the past 14 years, I have been promoting and selling my art online, as well as, exhibiting my artwork worldwide. I have also had many artists contact me, during this time, wanting to know, how I market, promote and sell my artwork on and offline. So in this post, I would like to share a few things I’ve learned from having my own, artist’s website and a few other arts business tips.

 

Outlook8studio_ Jenny Davis Etsy

 

Very early on, I learned, if you want people to take you seriously, your career as an artist is only as serious as you take it. You either work at it, as a job, putting in “regular” hours, or “occasionally” as a hobby. Its either a hobby, or your job. As a working artist its about working on your art day by day, as well as, marketing your art in all areas.

 

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I think every artist needs a website! With some hard work in the initial stages of setting up your own website, it’s always, worthwhile, getting your art online. In your own space you can do anything.

 

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Exposing your art online, helps promote and gets your work seen worldwide by potential collectors, gallery directors and other artists for collaborations and projects. Remember though, you are also competing with millions of other artists artwork, as well. So, your website, which is your online creative space, has to be place where, people will want to stop and spend time.

 

 

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After the initial set-up of my own website, with the generous help of several family members, (who I am forever grateful too) I then, had to put in the hard yards myself and learn the rest. I did many courses, tutorials and googled everything, I wanted to know. I soon found out, it’s not just a matter of making the website, uploading your artworks and sitting back, waiting for sales to walk out the door. Sounds great! But, it doesn’t usually work that way.

 

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You have to work really hard on your arts business and take it seriously. Mostly on a daily, or weekly basis, promoting, marketing, photographing artworks, descriptions, layouts, seo, meta tags, as well as, getting your website seen in many areas, including search engines.

 

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Social media is one way of getting your website seen if you post regularly. A Facebook business page,  Twitter and Instagram account will help you get a following, who in turn, may visit your website to find out more.

 

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Create newsletters, blog posts set- up exhibitions and share your art life with others on your website. Network and collaborate with other artist’s on forums and in art groups.

On your website and social- media sites, its good to share, how you make your art, your challenges, your successes. Make it real! This will build up a following of people who are genuinely interested in your art, and, in what you do. People want to trust and get to know an artist, before they buy online.

 

 

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Unless your famous, well known, or an established artist, picked up by reputable galleries, as a working artist, you really need to learn, how to diversify with your art.

It may not suit every artist, but, if you want to make a living from your art, these days, you need to be a creative business person too. Be open to, exploring other creative avenues, for sales and work. Your bread and butter money. This can be done alongside making, your more, serious gut- felt work for exhibitions and projects

 

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My bread and butter online websites Outlook8studio, Strazz and Atelierinparis I do have a vintage shop, as well,  Nostalgi but, after 8 years of being on Etsy, I am in the process of downsizing all shops and combining some together. Many thanks to some wonderful business advice, I received from Penny! at Sparrow Savage recently.

 

Modern living room with white colors

 

When uploading your artwork images onto your website, always make sure your photographs are professional looking, not blurred and as close possible to the colours in your original artwork. After-all,  it’s your photographs that sell your art, online.

 

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Great customer service is a must! Quickly answer any questions and concerns your customer may have. Don’t argue with your customers and be polite. If you do come across a problem, try to stay calm, cool and business- like, in your correspondence with them. They will eventually go away, but a bad business reputation won’t online.

 

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Packaging your artwork. Wrap your artwork professionally. I like to include a hand- signed “Certificate of Authenticity” (A statement that a work of art is genuine) with my artworks. To package small to medium size paintings on stretched canvas, I first wrap layers of acid free, tissue paper around the painting, then cut out a piece of stiff cardboard for each side. Bubble wrap it all, then pop the package into a custom- made box. A “thank you” note and instructions on how to look after the artwork, included in your package, goes a long way. Remember to slip in some extra business cards too, that can be passed onto other potential collectors/customers.

 

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If your artwork needs to be framed behind glass, I would suggest using, crystal clear perspex instead of glass. It looks like glass and is much safer and lighter, to ship, especially internationally, without the costs of breakages.

Once you get used to having a website and a presence online. It does get easier and is not so overwhelming. You may find by having your own website, it will open up a whole new world of opportunities for you and your arts business as well get your your artwork sold and out of the studio.

 

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What do you do to get your art seen online?

 

 

Professional Arts Business. Artist’s Wear Many Hats.

Wednesday, June 24th, 2015

Artist’s Wear Many Hats. Professional Arts Business.

Wouldn’t it be nice to get up everyday and just create and not have to worry about running an arts practice. Being an artist today means you are in business. You can’t survive on sales alone and have to create opportunities for yourself for those, who want to make a living from it.

According to the Australian Tax Office,“A professional arts business is a business you carry on as an author of an artistic work. This can be the artist, sculptor or photographer who created the work.”

 

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Artists need to wear many hats: creator, promoter, product developer, maker, writer, photographer, record keeper, shipper, packer, marketer, customer service rep. and so much more.

There are no hard and fast rules, or right or wrong way, on how, to run an arts business. Just use your creativity, trust your own artistic impulses and have fun. A few of my tips . ( Not in any order)

 

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Get plenty of rest.

Eat and sleep well.

Exercise daily. Walk, even if it’s only around your own garden.

 

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Make an effort to create everyday, even if it’s only for 10 mins. I have bouts of creativity, every few days. They can last days, weeks, or months. When I am working to a deadline though, I just have to create and everything else needs to take second place.

 

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I try to have enough work ready, for 2 exhibitions, just encase I’m asked to have a show, suddenly. (It has happened to me 2 times this year)

 

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I have finally, learned, to say NO in my life and business. I am now, very selective in choosing, exhibitions and work I do. Once upon a time, I took on everything offered to me and suffered severe burnout.

Write down ideas and visuals in a small sketch book, journal. Keep it beside you everywhere. I make, or, bulk buy, sketch books when school sales are on.

 

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Ask for help when you need it. Partners, family friends or professional help. Barter with your art if your unable to pay someone to help.

 

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I find sitting at the computer in short bouts helps, as, I have back, neck and arm problems.

Tweaking my online websites, is a full time job, in itself. I get it done, in small bits, daily.

I check my emails when I get up in the morning. Any sales, or urgent things, I try to deal with straight away, otherwise, I worry all day and night and won’t get anything, done.

I make major lists of all the biggish, events, exhibitions, grant writing, gallery submission, residency applications, I want to apply for, over next 12 months. I then, cut down the jobs, I need to do into small steps, to achieve my goals.I recently found a good site for this Evernote I use the basic free plan.

 

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1 or 2 days a week I photograph and document my artwork.

As soon as I make a sale, commission etc. I document it and keep a record of my customers, contact details and which artwork they bought.

 

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A website is a must for every artist, as most galleries want to see an online portfolio, for submissions, including, awards and arts residency, jobs and courses you apply for.

Facebook business pages, Twitter pages and other social media sites, all help you to get your art seen. Link up your website/blog post updates, to automatically post to your Facebook, Twitter and all your other social media sites.

 

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A blog is like your own personal space to create in. I use mine, as an art journal, to share, ideas, work in progress and a bit about, who I am. As well, it’s a place to see and buy my artwork.

Make a video of your creative process. People are interested in what you do. Make sure to have your website details in the credits so they see more art at your website.

 

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Take risks. Be resilient, flexible and find innovative ways to make money to fund your art.

Diversify with your art, without diluting it, so you can make a living. Doesn’t mean you are compromising yourself, or art. It’s just another, clever way, to get your art out there, make an income and continue your creative ideas.

Example: Limited edition art prints and quality home-wares etc. Teach from your studio, or create, online art courses. It all helps you make an income, so you can continue creating the art you want to do.

 

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Sensor Ship aqua Jenny davis

 

(I sold a selection of my art throw pillows and prints, which were curated, into an exhibition, at Federation Square, in Melbourne in, 2014) Helped fund, new art materials petrol and food.

 

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Make an arts mailing list. First, ask people, if they want to be on it. ( suppliers, customers, friends, collectors, galleries,magazines, interior designers, architects, director’s, artists and all those who have shown an interest in your art etc.)

Have packaging ready and try to reuse and recycle packaging where possible for when the sales come in.

I also, buy custom made boxes for my artworks and rigid mailers, cello bags for smaller ones. Every couple of months I do a inventory of packaging, to see what I need to replenish.

 

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Ship only a couple times a week so your not having to go out everyday.

Most of my art sales are overseas. To save money,  I package them myself, weigh them and go to the Auspost website, to calculate domestic and international costs.

 

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Most important! Take time out to do something different, or relax and do nothing.

 

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I need to get out of the studio occasionally, to spend time with other artists, family and friends.

 

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Spoil yourself, or someone else.

Have fun!

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Thank you Bluethumb!

Saturday, September 6th, 2014

I’m a bit late with this…

Thank you BLUETHUMB ! for listing me as one of your top 20 artists to watch in 2014

PCS 8

Times Square Show New York.

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014

I just got a nice surprise to say my artwork will be included in the Times Square Show in New York.

You’re in our celebration! You get three spots in our Times Square show. Your work will be 10 feet (3 meters) tall on the sign!

I am also, halfway of having an image of my work, 200 feet (60 meters) tall on the entire massive billboard !  If you would like to help me takeover the whole billboard in Times Square, the images below will take you to a like button.

A HUGE thank you to everyone for your continued support of my arts career! I really appreciate it 🙂

 

Didja!

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Kea Blue

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Fragility

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Selling Art Online.

Friday, January 31st, 2014

This article got me thinking…

Art Galleries, Art Sales and the Internet: A Survey  

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I can remember in 2000 thinking how I had to change the way I did things as an artist. After receiving injuries in a car accident I needed to find new ways to market and promote my artwork to the outside world

 

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So, I had a website designed where I could show, sell and write about my artwork and other related things of interest

 

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I believed at the time that an online portfolio was the way to go and that eventually every artist and gallery would do all their arts business online.

 

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Showcasing my art online allows me to work in reasonable physical comfort, for short amounts of time on my arts business. My website generates interest for my work from local and international audiences. I have received contacts from gallery directors, collectors, several awards, art residencies and invitations to exhibit my work in many countries

 

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Having a website allows me the freedom to control and curate my own exhibitions online. I can write on my blog and participate with other artists worldwide in collaborative art projects and exhibitions

I can set up a portfolio where my artwork is for sale

 

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Being online gets me out of my “studio mind” so I can network, share my thoughts, skills and ideas with others, as well as, sell my art to an international audience.

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Snap to Grid Exhibition. LACDA.

Monday, December 23rd, 2013

My latest group exhibition at the Los Angeles Center for Digital Art

SNAP TO GRID:

Jenny Davis_Fragility_2013

Slices in Time. Fragility. Jenny Davis.
In creating this artwork I used various processes. By physically dismantling objects and clothing I then wax the pieces. Some time later I reassemble the items and stage them into a still life composition in the studio.

December 12, 2013-January 4, 2014

Opening Reception December January 12, 7-9pm
in conjunction with the Downtown Art Walk

Los angeles center for digital art

104 East Fourth Street

Los Angeles, CA 90013

2013 Snap to Grid installation shots

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200 places to sell! Your Art or Craft Online

Saturday, August 17th, 2013

Resource time…  the first 12 of 200 places to sell your creations online.

2 of my favorite Australian sites at the moment, where I have listed a few of my own artworks .

Artfuly  

Bluethumb

Where to Sell Your Art or Craft Online.

  1. 3BStreet – A fun and quirky site with great visuals where you get your own animated storefront. Artist participation is juried, with a monthly fee as low at $9.95 per month + 3% of all transactions.

  2. 500px.com – Photography site – store your photos, share them and sell them. Features work of beginners to experts. Sell your work by opening a “store” account, which is available to free as well as paid memberships.

  3. AbsoluteArts – Claiming to be “the most trafficked contemporary arts site” it offers levels from free to premier. Artist bio/statement and portfolio displayed with shopping cart.

4. AbstractArtistGallery – Not an e-commerce site, this is a database of living abstract artists that presents work and includes a link to the artists website to drive traffic there. Juried; they request a donation from artists who are included.
5. AffordableBritishArt (UK Site) – Artists sell their work with no middleman, commission free, but there is a charge to have an account (4 tiered levels). You must have a PayPal account to receive payment for your work.

  1. Aftcra – This site calls themselves “the place to buy and sell one-of-a-kind goods proudly crafted by American hands.” Set up a storefront here for free, and product prices must be $10 or higher. Listings stay for four months. They take 7% fee on sales.

  2. Amazon – Upload your images to sell on one of the biggest marketplaces on the web. Jewelry is a huge category here, but you are competing with manufactured items.

  3. American Handmade Crafts – Free trial (with $35 setup). Monthly fees starting at $12, and each artist can list hundreds of items for sale. They provide a shopping cart.

  4. Art.com – This highly ranked e-commerce site has a division called Artist Rising, where emerging artists can upload images. They provide a print-on-demand service to sell your work. Two levels of membership – free and paid.

  5. Artaissance – This juried site is looking for sophisticated art that is suitable for art publishing, and is run by well-known frame manufacturer Larson-Juhl. If your work fits the bill, you can go through a submission process to become one of their featured artists.

See the other 180 online sites by Carolyn Edlund at Artsy Shark

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