Archive for the ‘Natural dyeing’ Category

Rust Dyeing Fabrics

Friday, December 28th, 2018


Summer in Australia is the perfect time for eco and botanical dyeing outdoors. During Winter, I like to save little bits of fabrics, lace and papers in a box for Summer dyeing. This is how I rust dye my fabrics….

Many years ago, I collected heaps of metal junk to use for sculpture. As, I no longer weld, I now use the rusty bits and pieces that are scattered all over my property, for my dyeing projects.

The gathering of the metal objects, wrapping them with the fabric spraying with vinegar and binding with rope and wire is quite relaxing. I call it mummy wrapping.


Rust Dyeing Fabric

MATERIALS:

Fabric: cottons silk… work best

Rusty metal objects: cooking pans, car parts, rusty nails, screws, pipes, copper objects

Wire, string, wool or rope just something to bind the fabric to the rusted item

Plain white vinegar

Rubber gloves

Plastic sheet or bags

METHOD

1. Gather all the items together wet your fabric and spray with vinegar.

2. Wrap the fabric around and around the rusted object as best you can.

3. Make sure it’s tightly bound with the string rope or wire. Cover with plastic so it stays moist.

4. Leave and wait for the magic to happen.

5. This may take an hour or 2 or if you want deeper textures of rust a week or 2. Then un- wrap your beautiful rusted fabric.

6. Once the fabric is dyed to the depth you want, soak for 30mins in warm water with a couple of tablespoons of salt to make the rust dye colourfast.

7. Wash gently in warm water with soap powder rinse dry and voila!

I also rust papers and larger pieces of fabric using a different method that I will share in a future post.

To see more of my free tutorials please go here

© 2018, Jenny Davis. All rights reserved.

Old Army Blanket and Collage.

Friday, April 21st, 2017

Still working on small textile collages.

 

 

I found an old army blanket from my childhood and couldn’t resist  it’s raggedy worn, loveliness and further rusted it. Leaving it in the elements outside for a few weeks.

 

 

It can take ages moving pieces around to get the right composition.

 

 

then sometimes it just happens straight away.

 

 

 

Adding more marks…

 

The good thing about using a stretched canvas as a base, I can stitch right into it.

Just like using a embroidery hoop.

 

© 2017, Jenny Davis. All rights reserved.

Wallmatter Exhibition Photos – Jenny Davis – 2016

Thursday, July 14th, 2016

Wallmatter Exhibition Photos – Jenny Davis – 2016

A huge thank you to everybody who attended the opening of my new exhibition Wallmatter last Saturday. A special thank you to all the people who helped me pull it altogether and make it a special day.  I feel so blessed and encouraged with all the support shown for my artwork and the new friendships I made.

Wallmatter continues until Tuesday August 16th at The Memo, Healesville Victoria. Free Entry. All artworks are for sale.

A few photos I took the next day as I forgot my camera on opening night.

Wallmatter

An installation of paint, concrete, rust and
textiles, inspired by imperfections and
weathered surfaces, linking to the abandoned
and neglected spaces found in urban and rural
environments.

Jenny Davis_Wallmatter Exhibition_2016 5s

 

Jenny Davis_Wallmatter Exhibition_2016 4s

 

Jenny Davis_Wallmatter Exhibition_2016 16s

 

Jenny Davis_Wallmatter Exhibition_2016 3s

 

Jenny Davis_Wallmatter Exhibition_2016 8s

“Surfaces and objects touched by time tell a
story and are a raw reflection of their environment.
I want to highlight the significance of a random
mark, or the crumbling texture of a wall in an
underground space. They are evidence to a
previous time in history. My abstractions are
investigations into marks and traces left behind
in the urban and rural environment.”
– Jenny Davis, Artist

 

Jenny Davis_Wallmatter Exhibition_2016 s

 

Jenny Davis_Wallmatter Exhibition_2016 19s

 

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Jenny Davis_Wallmatter Exhibition_2016 2s

 

Jenny Davis_Wallmatter Exhibition_2016 17s

 

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Jenny Davis_Wallmatter Exhibition_2016 12s

 

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Jenny Davis_Wallmatter Exhibition_2016 10s

 

Jenny Davis_Wallmatter Exhibition_2016 14s

© 2016, Jenny Davis. All rights reserved.

Japanese Shibori Workshop. Indigo Dyeing

Friday, February 5th, 2016

I recently spent a very enjoyable Saturday at Craftschooloz learning the Japanese dyeing technique Shibori. This involves folding, twisting or bunching cloth and binding it, then dyeing it in beautiful indigo.

Jenny Davis_ Shibori 7as

 

I wanted to see what effect the indigo dye would have on some of my previously rust dyed, lace and doily’s

 

Jenny Davis_ Shibori 1as

 

So, I clamped several wooden shapes over the areas where I didn’t want the indigo dye to seep in

 

Jenny Davis_ Shibori 11as

 

I was very happy with the result

 

Jenny Davis_Assemblage 3_ Found Objects ls

 

Old tablecloth, cotton fabrics and string

 

Jenny Davis_ Shibori 6as

 

Some beautiful dyed cloth from other people at the workshop

 

Jenny Davis_ Shibori 13as

 

This vintage tablecloth was clamped with shapes. The cloth had been previously dyed with rust and tea

 

Jenny Davis_ Shibori 4as

 

The Shibori method worked extremely well with all my pieces of vintage French lace, cotton, string and doily’s

 

Jenny Davis_ Shibori 9as

 

I love how indigo has many shades of greys, as well as blue, depending on what stage of fermentation, the dye vat is at

 

Jenny Davis_Assemblage 5_ Found Objects ls

 

Playing with some ideas…Victorian silk buttons

 

Jenny Davis_Assemblage a_ Found Objectss

 

buckles and rusty bits

 

Jenny Davis_ Assemblage 1_ Found Objects lsmall

tin

 

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and doily’s

 

Jenny Davis_Assemblage 4_ Found Objects lsmall

© 2016, Jenny Davis. All rights reserved.